S.T.E.A.M. Poetry Slam

Ten poets from MSU and the greater Lansing community will write and perform poetry about the social and environmental issues connected to the global climate crisis, and will compete for three cash prizes: a $500 grand prize, $250 second place prize, and $125 third place prize. The Exhibit S.T.E.A.M Poetry Slam (formally known as the STEAM Engine Poetry Slam) is one of the most unique poetry slams in the world because of the way it maintains the integrity of a normal poetry slam while also having its own personality and originality. The 5th installation of this poetry slam is hosted by Natasha T. Miller, MSU Museum’s Community Engagement Manager and a Women of the World Poetry Slam 3-time- top five finalist, and co-sponsored by RCAH Center for Poetry. This event will be live streamed for the public, and the top poets will be selected by 5 community judges. For registration and more details

Immersive Visualization Institute

EXPORING THE “ECOSYSTEM” OF DATA VISUALIZATION TECHNOLOGIES AT MICHIGAN STATE UNIVERSITY

Abrams Planetarium, MSU Libraries, and the MSU Museum have collaborated to foster an “ecosystem” of immersive visualization technologies for teaching, learning, and research at Michigan State University. Since 2019, the annual “Immersive Visualization Institute (IVI)” has brought together diverse groups of graduate students and faculty centered around data visualization. Program participants investigate innovative and interdisciplinary ideas for capitalizing on one or more of the platforms within the ecosystem and produce a participation outcome using the technologies. Read more on the MSU Museum website.

MSU Museum art/science/culture opportunities for fall 2022

1.5 Degrees Celsius

Through contributions of more than one dozen national and international artists, scientists, and researchers, the 1.5 ° Celsius exhibition and its supporting public programs explore the global climate crisis. For more information about the 1.5 degrees Celsius exhibit.

2040 (film showing)

Award-winning director Damon Gameau (That Sugar Film) embarks on a journey to explore what the future could look like by the year 2040 if we simply embraced the best solutions already available to us to improve our planet and shifted them rapidly into the mainstream. Structured as a visual letter to his 4-year-old daughter, Damon blends traditional documentary with dramatized sequences and high-end visual effects to create a vision board of how these solutions could regenerate the world for future generations. Register to attend and more information on the film

Exhibit STEAM Poetry Slam

en poets from MSU and the greater Lansing community will write and perform poetry about the social and environmental issues connected to the global climate crisis, and will compete for three cash prizes: a $500 grand prize, $250 second place prize, and $125 third place prize. The Exhibit S.T.E.A.M Poetry Slam (formally known as the STEAM Engine Poetry Slam) is one of the most unique poetry slams in the world because of the way it maintains the integrity of a normal poetry slam while also having its own personality and originality. The 5th installation of this poetry slam is hosted by Natasha T. Miller, MSU Museum’s Community Engagement Manager and a Women of the World Poetry Slam 3-time- top five finalist, and co-sponsored by RCAH Center for Poetry. This event will be live streamed for the public, and the top poets will be selected by 5 community judges. More information and registration for STEAM Poetry Slam

MSU Broad art/science events for fall 2022

ARACHNOBROADIA!

Sunday, Oct. 23, 1-4pm

MSU Broad Art Museum + MSU Bug House // Families

Join us for a spooky afternoon of eight-legged fun for all ages inspired by artwork from the collection of the MSU Broad Art Museum! Get creative with creepy crafts, then visit your favorite crawly creatures at the MSU Bug House.

DISABILITY ECOLOGIES: THE ART OF LIVING ON A DISABLED PLANET

Friday, Nov. 18, 12-1:30pm

Join the MSU Broad Art Museum and HIVES for this online participatory workshop on disabled ecologies which scholar Sunaura Talor defines as “the webs of disability that are created spatially, temporally, and across species boundaries when ecosystems are contaminated, depleted, and profoundly altered.”

CURATOR TOUR

Sunday, Nov. 20, 1-2pm

Join Assistant Curator Rachel Winter for a special walkthrough of the exhibition Zaha Hadid Design: Untold, which explores the life and creative practice of the MSU Broad Art Museum building’s architect, Zaha Hadid, and the work of her studio, Zaha Hadid Design.

Arts/Science Collaborations in the STEM Teaching & Learning Facility: Two Fellows Programs for STEAMpower

Through the MSU Arts Initiative, the new STEM Teaching & Learning Facility is offering two unique opportunities for faculty, staff, and graduate students to learn and work together to build interdisciplinary collaborations across arts, humanities, and STEM.

STEAMpower Faculty/Staff Fellows. We seek four staff or faculty in any discipline (arts, sciences, social sciences, etc.) with a demonstrated interest in the intersections between STEM, humanities, and arts. Faculty/Staff Fellows will interact with other STEAMpower Faculty/Staff Fellows and Graduate Students as well as artists-in-residence from across MSU; create a deliverable on an art/science/culture project of their own design; and develop a curriculum that bridges the STEM-Arts divide. Fellows are also expected to present their work at an end of year symposium. Funds up to $10,000 are available per Fellow. The fellowship will run from Fall 2022 through Spring 2023. Application is live and available here – deadline is Aug. 25, 2022. Application questions are provided below for your convenience. 

STEAMpower Graduate Fellows. We seek four to eight graduate students in any discipline (arts, sciences, social sciences, etc.) with a demonstrated interest in the intersections between STEM, humanities, and arts. Graduate students will interact with and assist artists-in-residence and Faculty/Staff Fellows, create a deliverable on an art/science/culture project of their own design, and present your deliverable to the MSU community at the end of the academic year in whatever format makes sense to you! Graduate Fellows will also collaborate with Faculty/Staff Fellows to develop interdisciplinary teaching-related products. A stipend of $3000 per graduate student for the year is available. Click here for more information on this graduate fellowship. It will run from Fall 2022 through Spring 2023. Application is live and available here – deadline is Aug. 25, 2022. Application questions are provided below for your convenience. 

Qualtrics applications and questions from the applications to help you prepare.

STEAMpower Faculty/Staff Fellows: https://msu.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_5ourrhs9Dd2rKiG 

Name:

Email:

Statement of availability: I have discussed this opportunity with my supervisor, as needed, AND am eligible to receive overload pay, course buyout, or similar types of compensation.

  1. Why are you interested in becoming a STEAMpower Faculty/Staff Fellow? 250 words
  2. Describe what you believe you will get out of working with an interdisciplinary team on Arts-STEM interaction. 500 words
  3. What strengths or experiences in STEM, humanities, and/or arts intersections do you bring to this opportunity? 250 words
  4. In one sentence, describe what you believe will be most challenging for you in the role as a STEAMpower Faculty/Staff Fellow.

STEAMpower Graduate Fellows

https://msu.co1.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_bKEpGUGnfQB2FDg

Name:

Email:

  1. Why are you interested in becoming a STEAMpower Graduate Fellow? 250 words
  2. Describe what you believe you will get out of working with an interdisciplinary team on Arts-STEM interaction. 500 words
  3. What strengths or experiences in STEM, humanities, and/or arts intersections do you bring to this opportunity? 250 words
  4. In one sentence, describe what you believe will be most challenging for you in the role as a STEAMpower Graduate Fellow.
Art students incorporating science practices.

New Course Offering in Art and Science

Course Title: Art and Science in the Laboratory
STA 491L
Giltner Hall, RM 255
TTH 3-5:30

‘Bacteria perform processes. Scientists perform experiments. Algorithms perform actions. Humans perform gender and sex. The question is who or what nowadays doesn’t perform?’

– Chris Salter
Adam Brown leading artists in scientific endeavors.

Why is this course Needed? The integration of arts into science practice has resulted in a newly emerging, integrative discipline often called STEAM (Science Technology, Engineering, Arts and Mathematics). What is largely missing from the STEAM movement, is recognition that a cadre of scientifically literate practicing artists will be needed to make it possible. Even more importantly, the STEAM movement generally overlooks the existence of a vibrant and growing practice of scientifically based artistic practices among artists themselves, variously falling under the rubrics of Bioarts, Transmedia Arts, etc. These novel art practices promise to feed back into science practices just
as science practices are feeding into the arts. Due to the critical nature of the arts, these artistic endeavors can push forward the sciences upon which they are based as well as providing needed social, cultural, ethical, and intellectual commentary about the meaning of those shared practices.

Who should take this course? The course will be targeted at seniors majoring in the arts and graduate students in the arts and humanities as well as curious biology and ecology related graduate students and 3rd and 4th year
undergraduates. The aim of Art and Science in the Laboratory is to attract a diverse set of thinkers and practitioners based in the arts, the humanities, and the sciences. If you are an artist who wants to explore the sciences, a scientist who wants to peer into the arts or a humanist who wants to explore the material and the theoretical world firsthand,
then this course is for you! The course will be a one semester introduction to laboratory science through a set of conceptual, technical and analytical experiments, tools and research practices geared to enable novel artistic practices. The value of the course
will be four-fold: 1) to demonstrate ways in which current art practices have emerged from appropriation and transformation of scientific methods and materials; 2) to open new artistic possibilities; 3) to create through shared practices, a common ground between sciences and arts that benefits both disciplines; 4) to motivate the next
generation of artists to explore, exploit, and expand this common ground.
Art and Science in the Laboratory will be a radically interdisciplinary, hands on, and use experiential-based learning modalities. To accomplish these goals the course begins with a series of reenactments of a few pivotal scientific experiments. Students will repeat versions of these experiments to learn bench practices of modern science that are
currently employed by cutting edge artists. Later in the course, students will be encouraged to rethink and reconceptualize these experiments using critical artistic practice to explore new possibilities.


For more information, inquiries or enrollment please contact Professor Adam Brown: brown293@msu.edu
http://AdamWBrown.net

artist drawing from skull still life

Giraffe Skulls and Graphite Pencils

Recently comparative anatomy students at Michigan State University found themselves in a room with art graduate students and other members of the community participating in a new series of activities promoting the intersection of arts and sciences. Specimens from the MSU Museum were on loan and displayed for an open drawing session where both artists and scientists could hone their skills in observation and representation. Skulls of a giraffe, rhinoceros, and others combined with study skins and stuffed birds and skeletons to create a macabre scene…or if you are a science nerd, a “haven of coolness.”

photo taken by Terri McElhinny

These are typical sights for a comparative anatomy student, but not necessarily for art students; similarly trying to represent a still life is more in the wheelhouse of the artist than a scientist. However, both groups count observation as one of the primary skills in their respective fields. The question “How can artists and scientists learn from each other to improve their skills?” is the impetus behind a new set of activities being promoted on MSU’s campus. The connection and impacts between art and science has been explored and reported on by MSU’s own Dr. Robert Root Bernstein, where he has explored among other ideas, how arts avocations may foster success in scientists. (Root-Bernstein et al, 2008). 

photo taken by Terri McElhinny


The session was led by Ben Duke, Associate Professor in Art, Art History, and Design, and Terri McElhinny, Associate Professor of Integrative Biology. Dr. McElhinny teaches IBIO 328: Comparative Anatomy and Biology of the Vertebrates, a course that includes a laboratory in which students conduct a comparative study of anatomy by dissecting a lamprey, shark, frog, and cat. She says, “Oftentimes students are laser-focused on recognizing and naming individual structures on their specimens like the orbit of the eye or the zygomatic arch (cheekbone). This event allowed us to step back and spend time appreciating the whole form of a specimen in a different way. Additionally, cognitive psychologists have demonstrated that drawing can enhance learning (Fernandes et al 2018). Participating in this event has me thinking about how to incorporate drawing as part of our lab activities in the future.” 

photo taken by Terri McElhinny

In addition to future drawing sessions, the group has discussed field trips to do nature journaling, working with specialized equipment such as Scanning Electron Microscopes (SEM) to create artistic images, ‘drawing’ with microbes on petri dishes, and translating microscope views into meaningful images.

To be informed of future events, please feel free to use our sign up form.  

References:

Fernandes, MA, JD Wammes, ME Meade. “The Surprisingly Powerful Influence of Drawing on Memory”. Current Directions in Psychological Science, 27.5 (2018): 302-308.

Root-Bernstein, Robert, et al. “Arts foster scientific success: avocations of nobel, national academy, royal society, and sigma xi members.” Journal of Psychology of Science and Technology 1.2 (2008): 51-63.

photo taken by Terri McElhinny

Art and Science Film Festival Hosted by MSU Museum

MSU Museum Collaborates on a New Outdoor Film Series
Exploring Humankind’s Understanding of the World

After two years of social distancing and other precautions due to the ongoing pandemic, the MSU Museum is pleased to bring the local community together in an outdoor public setting for an exciting new films series that will entertain, enlighten, and illuminate minds.

– MSU Museum

Visit MSU Museum film series website.